What to Do in an Unforeseen Critical Event

GCSMarineLogo_WhiteBG_576x144Boating season is in full swing and families everywhere are enjoying time on the water, but what if that time is marred by your boat hitting rocks or other unseen debris in the water?  What if rocks or other debris get sucked into the intake?  What should you do?  How do you keep your family and your boat safe?

Life Jackets and Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)

Stohlquist Escape Life JacketAlways have enough life jackets for every crew member and passenger on board.  In many states here in the U.S., children under a certain age must were life preservers at all times while on board and on the docks.  Adults and crew members may want to always wear theirs as well to set a good example for any minors.

No one wants to hit an object in the water accidentally, but even the most diligent of captains may not see hidden debris under the water.  Wearing a life jacket ensures, if the boat is jarred violently or if the engine stalls suddenly, anyone knocked overboard will be much safer.

Never BUI (Boating Under the Influence)

Operation Dry WaterRemember to “launch like a boss” and “dock like a boss;” never boat under the influence (BUI). Per Operation Dry Water, alcohol:

  • is the leading contributing factor in fatal boating accidents
  • was the leading factor in nearly one-fourth of recreational boating deaths (21%) in 2014
The “National Boating Under the Influence Awareness” campaign starts June 24, 2016 – June 26, 2016.  Join Operation Dry Water in taking the pledge to #NeverBUI.

If You Do Get Stuck

boat stuck on sandbarIf you do get stuck on some unseen debris or rocks, or worse yet if you run aground, don’t try to force the boat over the spot.  You might wind up just getting yourself stuck further.  Neither should you try to back off the debris immediately either.  You may wind up sucking bits and pieces, mud, or plant-life into the engine, which could lead you to our next two pointers; you may have to replace your impeller or drive shaft as a result.

First, make sure the boat isn’t leaking or taking on water.  If you’re sure you can back up safely without damaging the engine (i.e., nothing will get sucked into the engine that shouldn’t), reverse with the engine carefully or better yet with a mainsail if possible.  It’s even better to wait for the tide to rise and raise the boat off the spot, if you can.  If there’s no tide or the tide isn’t in your favor, you may have to ask another boat or call for a tow.

Keep an Extra Impeller or Two On-Board

Globe High-flow ImpellerImpellers are small, yet integral parts of your boat’s engine.  Keep an extra impeller or two on hand at all times on the boat.  Typically, they’re small enough that an extra impeller or two won’t prohibit keeping any other safety gear.  Power & Motoryacht magazine advises to keep at least one extra impeller “for each and every pump onboard” your boat.  After all, Globe Marine Impellers are reasonably priced and affordable.  Besides, it beats waiting for a tow!

Find the Right Impeller

Install a Globe Marine DRIVESAVER®

Globe Marine DRIVESAVERIf rocks or small debris do make their way into the engine, replace the impeller.  Also, be sure to check that the drive shaft isn’t damaged, bent, or broken.  A great way of preventing the latter is to install a Globe Marine DRIVESAVER®.  Globe Marine DRIVESAVER®s can spare your engine and transmission in the event that foreign objects make their way past the intake and into the engine, potentially saving you costly repairs or even having to replace the transmission.

See below for what can happen without any protection for your drive shaft installed:

Damage to motor without Globe Marine DRIVESAVER
What Happens To Motor w/o DRIVESAVER

What Happens to Motor without DRIVESAVER

Time to Replace Your Boat’s Impeller

GCSMarineLogo_WhiteBG_576x144It’s time to replace your boat’s impeller, if f you haven’t already done so and Spring is the beginning of your boating season.  Globe Marine recommends that every boat owner replace their engine impeller once every boating season to get optimal use and reliability for your boat’s engine.  Here’s why…

Stored Impellers Can’t Run at Their Best

No Worn Impellers

No Worn Impellers – an impeller that’s “taken a set”

If you stored your boat this winter, the impeller shouldn’t be left in your boat’s engine or pump when first opened for spring.  Why?  Leaving impellers in the boat engines over the winter, especially in cold climates, can cause the impeller to “take a set.”  More than likely, the impeller will still work, but you won’t get optimal water or diesel flow from it.

Likewise, if you tried to store your impeller in a special fluid to preserve it over the winter, it may still “take a set”, or worse, degrade due to the fluid.  Besides these preservatives not being recommended by most manufacturers, re-installed impellers almost always are warped or damaged — not to mention challenging to re-install.  The re-installed impeller still may work initially, but you won’t get optimal performance out of it.  It’s bound to let you down when you need it the most.

If it’s Common Advice, it’s Good Advice

Globe High-flow ImpellerAlmost all impeller manufacturers recommend replacing impellers at least once per season, so it’s a safe bet that you should probably do so at the beginning of each boating season.  These recommendations have come from rigorous testing and development. Manufacturers know what the best operating conditions — and the not-so-great conditions — are for your particular impeller to run at its best.  It may seem smart to save $20-$30 by re-using an old impeller, but you’ll spend more on gas and possibly even engine or pump repairs. In the long run, you’ll save money by replacing your impeller now while getting your vessel ready for the new season.

Impellers Are Affordable

Depending on your engine size and model, impellers are a small portion of the total maintenance costs for your boat.  It really isn’t too much to pay for optimal engine performance and may even save you a little on fuel consumption and efficiency.  It’s better than waiting for a tow or getting stranded out on the water with an overheated engine or broken pump.  With those benefits, a new impeller may even pay for itself in just a few short weeks.

red-blue_overlay-med450x308Globe Marine has 71 different sizes of our famous Run-Dry® Impellers, the only impeller guaranteed to run-dry for up to 15 minutes, from which to choose.  Nearly half of our impellers come with matching gaskets and O-rings included in their see-through packaging and almost all impellers have corresponding models for both water or diesel transfer applications.

Chances are, there’s a Globe Marine Run-Dry® impeller to match your boat’s needs. To find the right Globe Run-Dry® Impeller for you, see our easy-to-use search feature, allowing you to match your existing engine or pump model by manufacturer or impeller dimensions:

Find the Right Impeller

References

New for 2015! Globe Model 300 Run-dry® Impeller

Why Use Globe Run-dry® Impellers?

Run-dry Impeller Test Results

Click for larger view…

… Because when run-dry performance counts, you can count on Globe Marine. Globe Marine Run-dry® Impellers are the only impellers in the world guaranteed to run dry for up to 15 minutes. Globe impellers are made of Brandonite® a high-strength, elastomeric material with self-lubricating compounds for run-dry protection and improved resistance to sand and dirt to help keep you going in the most difficult conditions. Our impellers help to protect your engine in a damaging event and are priced competitively compared to standard neoprene impellers.

What’s New About Model 300?

Run-dry Impeller Blue w. Brass CoreGlobe Run-dry® Impeller Model 300 comes with a brass core to meet the most demanding pump applications. It’s designed to withstand sunlight, saltwater, diesel fuel, and caustic chemicals and lubricants. All of Globe Marine’s impellers are designed to withstand the harshest of conditions, including continual exposure to the elements.

Specs

Model 300 Run-Dry® Blue Impeller
Outside Diameter: 4 1/2″ (95 mm)
Width: 4 5/16″ (102 mm)
Shaft Diameter: 1″ (25 mm)
Core Type: Brass
Number of Blades: 10
Liquid Type: Water
Drive Type: 45° 10-Tooth Spline
Manufacturer’s Models It Replaces: Sherwood 30000

Where Can I Get One?

Run-dry Impeller Blue - frontGlobe Marine offers a wide variety of impellers with 82 sizes from which to choose. We have impeller models to fit any engine. To find the nearest dealer near you, use our handy Find a Dealer tool. Unsure of which impeller model you need for your boat’s engine? Use our comprehensive Find the Right Impeller guide.

Globe Marine in Power & MotorYacht magazine’s: Essential Spare Parts…

Power & MotorYacht MagazineRead about Globe Marine’s impellers and other parts in Power & MotorYacht magazine’s excellent write-up for this month’s Maintenance section in the October 15, 2014 issue.

The article by Mike Smith titled, “Essential Spare Parts to Keep on Your Boat,” discusses which parts are absolute must-haves, like Globe Run-Dry Impellers® and DRIVESAVERs®, for cruising on your boat or even small trips and which parts you can comfortably leave behind making more room on your boat for fun, family, and friends.

Globe Marine Introduces Run-Dry Impeller Model #270

Globe Marine's Run-dry Impeller 270Globe Marine is pleased to announce another new marine impeller model added to its line of world-class Globe Run-Dry® Impellers — the only impellers able to run dry for up to 15 minutes. This model is the fifth new impeller introduced into the market by Globe this year.

Globe Marine Run-Dry Impeller 270 pkg
Run-Dry® Impeller Model #270 (part number 01-12-2046) replaces Sherwood 27000K and Cummins 3974456 impellers and uses Globe’s proprietary long-lasting, self-lubricating, composite material. Unlike impellers made from traditional neoprene materials, Globe Marine’s Run-dry® Impeller is guaranteed to run-dry for up to 15 minutes. Those crucial minutes could mean the difference between either saving your engine or incurring costly repairs. And, this impeller comes with an O-ring to make replacement even easier.

The new impeller is available for purchase online to Globe distributors at www.globemarine.com.

Interested in becoming a Globe Marine dealer or distributor? Apply here.

Details

Packaging

  • Globe Marine Run-Dry® Impeller Model #270 comes with Globe’s unique packaging, including its matching O-ring for easy installation.
Dimensions
  • 3-1/4 inches diameter
  • 2-7/8 inches wide
  • 3/4 inch shaft diameter
  • 11-point involuted spline with a brass core
Use/Application
  • Globe Marine Run-dry® Impeller Model #270 is for use in water transfer applications only.
  • It can replace impeller models Sherwood 27000K and Cummins 3974456.
Price
  • Suggested retail price is $85 — very competitive compared to other impeller manufacturers using neoprene or rubber materials.

Buy a Globe Marine Run-Dry® Impeller

Find a Store:
  • Use our Find A Dealer to look up the local Globe dealer or distributor near you.
  • Globe Marine dealers and distributors login to GlobeMarine.com at any time to purchase.
Unsure of which impeller you may need?
Want to know if your impeller includes gaskets & O-rings?

Dr. Strange Composite?

(Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Started Loving Non-Metallic Materials)

question mark icon Surfing around the internet this week, looking for what’s new in the marine and boating world, I came across quite a few forums where the questions arose:

  • What is a composite anyway?
  • Are composite impellers the same as plastic?

Much to my dismay, the forum posters almost invariably concluded that composite parts were pretty much the same as plastic — if not in composition, at least in performance. Oh no! I thought and tried to post to the forums myself, but alas they were not allowing anymore comments. Hence, this month’s blog is on why composite parts are so much better than plastic.

What is a composite material?

What exactly is a composite anyway? Here’s a simplified definition from wiseGeek.org:

Beackers & Cylinders

“Composite materials … are formed by combining two or more materials in such a way that the constituents are still distinguishable and not fully blended…

This type of material takes advantage of the different strengths and abilities of its different elements.”

In other words, a composite is a blend or mixture of two or more materials, one of which may/may not be plastic, in order to improve the properties of all the materials in the composite. One material in the combo might be chosen for its ability to bend or stretch, while another might be chosen for its strength. Different materials — anything from wood, to metal, to glass, to plastic, to resins (both organic and man-made), etc. — can be chosen for their desired properties to create a composite material. It all depends on what you want the end result to be able to do.

Aren’t they the same as plastic?

Globe Run-dry Impellers (various)Composites are so much more than the plastic used in picnic ware, drinking glasses and cigarette lighters. Many composites may contain plastics, like thermoplastics, but are mixed with other materials to dramatically change their physical characteristics such as shear and tensile strength, stretch, flexibility, ability to retain their shape (like microfiber foam) — or other properties.

For instance, our Globe’s Run-Dry® Impellers aren’t “plastic.” They may look and feel like plastic, but have properties that plastic alone doesn’t possess. Due to the mixture of numerous compounds, our impellers are self-lubricating and, as a result, can ‘run-dry’ in an engine for up to 15 minutes.

Traditional plastic or rubber impellers can bend, snap, or even break into small pieces that get stuck in the engine. Likewise, metal impellers can bend or warp causing the engine to stall.

Here’s why composites rock:

superhero iconBecause of its very nature, a composite’s whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Composite materials are like getting the best of both worlds: the strength of one material with flexibility of another yet still retain the shape of a third. (Or, other properties such as coefficient of friction, ability to ward off infection, invisibility to radar … the list goes on and on.) They’re like cherry-picking all of the best superhero powers and putting them into one. What plastic can say that?