Time to Replace Your Boat’s Impeller

GCSMarineLogo_WhiteBG_576x144It’s time to replace your boat’s impeller, if f you haven’t already done so and Spring is the beginning of your boating season.  Globe Marine recommends that every boat owner replace their engine impeller once every boating season to get optimal use and reliability for your boat’s engine.  Here’s why…

Stored Impellers Can’t Run at Their Best

No Worn Impellers

No Worn Impellers – an impeller that’s “taken a set”

If you stored your boat this winter, the impeller shouldn’t be left in your boat’s engine or pump when first opened for spring.  Why?  Leaving impellers in the boat engines over the winter, especially in cold climates, can cause the impeller to “take a set.”  More than likely, the impeller will still work, but you won’t get optimal water or diesel flow from it.

Likewise, if you tried to store your impeller in a special fluid to preserve it over the winter, it may still “take a set”, or worse, degrade due to the fluid.  Besides these preservatives not being recommended by most manufacturers, re-installed impellers almost always are warped or damaged — not to mention challenging to re-install.  The re-installed impeller still may work initially, but you won’t get optimal performance out of it.  It’s bound to let you down when you need it the most.

If it’s Common Advice, it’s Good Advice

Globe High-flow ImpellerAlmost all impeller manufacturers recommend replacing impellers at least once per season, so it’s a safe bet that you should probably do so at the beginning of each boating season.  These recommendations have come from rigorous testing and development. Manufacturers know what the best operating conditions — and the not-so-great conditions — are for your particular impeller to run at its best.  It may seem smart to save $20-$30 by re-using an old impeller, but you’ll spend more on gas and possibly even engine or pump repairs. In the long run, you’ll save money by replacing your impeller now while getting your vessel ready for the new season.

Impellers Are Affordable

Depending on your engine size and model, impellers are a small portion of the total maintenance costs for your boat.  It really isn’t too much to pay for optimal engine performance and may even save you a little on fuel consumption and efficiency.  It’s better than waiting for a tow or getting stranded out on the water with an overheated engine or broken pump.  With those benefits, a new impeller may even pay for itself in just a few short weeks.

red-blue_overlay-med450x308Globe Marine has 71 different sizes of our famous Run-Dry® Impellers, the only impeller guaranteed to run-dry for up to 15 minutes, from which to choose.  Nearly half of our impellers come with matching gaskets and O-rings included in their see-through packaging and almost all impellers have corresponding models for both water or diesel transfer applications.

Chances are, there’s a Globe Marine Run-Dry® impeller to match your boat’s needs. To find the right Globe Run-Dry® Impeller for you, see our easy-to-use search feature, allowing you to match your existing engine or pump model by manufacturer or impeller dimensions:

Find the Right Impeller

References

Globe Marine speaks w/ “Composites Weekly”

CompositesWeekly_icon_380x329Globe Marine’s and Globe Composite Solutions’ own engineer, Brian Evans, recently spoke with Jonathan Taylor from Composites Weekly magazine — the industry’s foremost leading podcast on engineered composites, plastics, and advanced materials — in their weekly interview. Read on to learn more about the innovative composite materials Globe Marine’s Run-Dry Impellers®, DRIVESAVERs®, and other marine parts and accessories are comprised.

Globe Marine’s Parts Are Made from Brandonite®

Globe Marine DRIVESAVERsGlobe Marine’s Run-Dry Impellers® and DRIVESAVERs® are made from Globe’s proprietary composite materials, called Brandonite®. Brandonite® is a family of innovative and patented composite materials made by Globe alone to ensure that your marine parts withstand the tests of time, the ravages of the elements, and wear and tear beyond the expectation of OEM parts. Our Brandonite® materials also are made to break apart in the event of an unforeseen engine crisis or accident, saving your boat from metal shards or shrapnel lodging in your engine. See how Globe Marine’s DRIVESAVERs® can save your engine and mean the difference between replacing a part in your boat’s engine or replacing your entire transmission.

View Now

Globe Marine Run-dry® Impellers are Self-Lubricating

With Globe Composite Solutions’ patented composite formulas, Globe Marine’s Run-Dry Impellers® are self-lubricating. Meaning, they have the lubricating agent infused into the composite material from which they’re made. This self-lubrication makes Globe Marine’s Run-Dry Impellers® the only impeller on the market able to run dry for up to 15 minutes!

Listen Now!

Listen to Globe Marine’s and Globe Composite Solutions’ engineer, Brian Evans, review all of the above mentioned Globe Marine products and their benefits in Composites Weekly‘s podcast:

Watch / Listen Now

Find the Right Part and Model

Need an impeller or DRIVESAVER® now? Find the right run-dry impeller or DRIVESAVER® with Globe Marine’s comprehensive search tools.

Find the Right Impeller
Find the right DRIVESAVER®

Shop Now!

Need to know where to shop? Find a Globe Marine dealer near you:

Find a Globe Marine Dealer

References:

The Importance of Nautical Charts & Maps

Sextant & ChartBefore GPS … Before radar … And, even before sonar, a sailor’s best chance at finding the way around the big blue was charts and maps. The sextant and the night sky are not withstanding. They’re too dependent on the weather and the level of math required to properly use a sextant meant that your charts and maps were your last, best hope. (Yes, even a couple of hundred years ago, math was not everyone’s best subject — one of the many reasons the position of captain was so difficult to staff.) Even with a sextant, if you were missing or had incorrect charts and maps, many a captain and ship were lost forever, never to return. Hey, doesn’t it make you want to run out and be a pirate? It’s not all puffy blouses and sabers.

Battle Ship painting by radojavor

Tips on Reading a Nautical ChartOld Cape Cod Bay, 1933, from NOAA

  • Study your charts thoroughly.
  • Look at the position from which you will start and visually follow along the course you wish to take.
  • Look for “notes” – water depths, obstructions (especially under water), bridges, power lines or any other unusual items that may be a hazard to your progress.
  • Make a note of each of these on a separate piece of paper.
  • Make note of all buoys and markers you may pass in the order they will appear. This will give you a documented picture of your route and what you should expect to see without having to continually try to find a small marker on the chart.
  • Look for visual objects featured on your chart that you should be able to observe and identify to confirm your position.
  • Always check the weather before departing – in this case, also to make sure you will be safe in navigating the waters.  (Chart Reading 101; McNiel, Bill; http://boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/chart101.htm)

But, I Have a Small Boat on a Lake…

Sailboat Lost On LakeTake it from BoatSafe.com sailor and writer, Bill McNiel, even with a small boat on a lake it’s best to have your charts and maps handy. Read on as he bemoans an afternoon of spelling out directions to skippers, without charts and maps, simply ferrying boats across a lake in Atlanta. No huge disaster, but it would’ve gone a lot faster had the skippers had charts and maps of the lake.

Keeping your bearings and keeping accurate bearings are essential for small boat positioning as well. Even with instruments, what if it’s cloudy, or you get interference?

As the School of Sailing aptly wrote: “The nautical chart is for the mariner what the road map is for the driver.” You wouldn’t go on a road trip without a map, right? Ok, maybe you would, but obviously you’ve never had your GPS quit on you here:

Mojave Desert, The Great NothingWhere Can I Get Charts & Maps?

American Nautical ServicesThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration provides nautical charts and maps, as well as many chart and mapmakers. American Nautical Services can provide you not only with charts and maps, but also with many instruments and accessories from sextants, to compasses, to paper weights, and even flags. Bon voyage!

Resources